Q/Below is a hypothetical scenario. Please discuss and address the… Q/Below is a hypothetical scenario. Please discuss and address the scenario from an

Q/Below is a hypothetical scenario. Please discuss and address the… Q/Below is a hypothetical scenario. Please discuss and address the scenario from an ethical point of view by referring to code of ethics and (care/integrity/competency) principles.  It is April 2022. You’re the pharmacist working at a small pharmacy in regional Victoria. Many of the people in the community are of non-English speaking background. There is also a large proportion of people who are retired, and people with a low socio-economic status. One day, the owner of the pharmacy calls all staff for a staff meeting. The owner informs everyone that he is bringing in a range of new homeopathy medicine products and is advertising it as a ‘COVID-19 prevention starter pack’, retailing at $35 per packet. He would like all staff to recommend this to every customer who comes into the pharmacy, and no customer should leave without making a purchase. To enforce the sales of this starter pack, the owner also stopped offering COVID-19 vaccinations. After the meeting, the owner pulls you aside and states that wants you to enforce generic substitutions on all patients unless the ‘No brand substitution allowed’ box is ticked. He also says that this is something you should tell all pharmacy students and dispensary technicians to do. Immediately after your conversation with the owner, one of your regular customers, Mrs Jennis comes in. Mrs Jennis doesn’t speak English and sometimes gets confused with her medications. As a result, you usually supply her the same brand of medications because you know Mrs Jennis recognizes her pills by the colour of the boxes. The owner talks with her and tells her that he is going to “do her a favour” by giving her the generic medication this time, which is “just the same as the one she normally gets, just less expensive”. You can see that Mrs Jennis is already getting confused. The blood pressure medication she usually takes comes in a green box, but the new generic the owner is giving her comes in a white box, which is the same box colour as her diabetes medication. A few weeks later, your pharmacy gets 10 boxes of government approved oral COVID-19 medications indicated for COVID-19 treatment. You later get a phone call from a local doctor asking if you have any stock, as she has a 90-year-old patient who is eligible for the medication. Your owner who was standing nearby snatches the phone over and tells the doctor that you didn’t get any stock. The owner later tells you that it’s good to keep some COVID-19 medications on hand ‘just in case’, and no one checks on a small pharmacy like this one anyway. Later, the owner’s son comes in and hands you several scripts which all requests for the oral COVID-19 medications. You notice that they are all for the owner’s family. You notice that the doctor’s signature is missing on several scripts, and you question the legitimacy of the script. Upon checking the dispensing history, you notice that the owner has been regularly dispensing medications to his family without any doctors details. From your knowledge, the owner’s family are all young, healthy, and fully vaccinated. You ask the owner’s son if anyone in the family has COVID-19 and he says no. You then receive a phone call from the owner who tells you that the script is perfectly fine, and you can dispense it. A week later the owner comes back. He pulls you aside and tells you that he has been keeping a close eye on sales figures and that your ‘COVID-19 prevention starter pack’ sales are the lowest. The owner tells you that you need to “do better” and that there are “plenty of young pharmacists who would like your job – you can leave if you don’t like it”.  Health Science Science Nursing HEALTH PHAR1017 Share QuestionEmailCopy link Comments (0)

A classification essay is a type of essay that categorizes or sorts items or ideas into groups. Here are some steps to help you write a classification essay:

Choose a topic: The first step in writing a classification essay is to choose a topic. Think of a topic that can be divided into categories or groups. For example, you could write about different types of pets, different genres of movies, or different types of sports fans.

Develop a thesis statement: Once you have chosen a topic, develop a thesis statement. This is the main point or message that you want to convey in your essay. The thesis statement should be a single sentence that summarizes the main idea of your essay.

Write an outline: Write an outline of your essay, including an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. The introduction should introduce the topic and provide some background information. The body paragraphs should explore the different categories or groups, and the conclusion should summarize the main points and provide a final thought.

Write the introduction: In the introduction, introduce the topic and provide some background information. End the introduction with your thesis statement.

Write the body paragraphs: In the body paragraphs, explore the different categories or groups of your topic. Use clear examples and evidence to support your claims. Use transitional phrases to connect the categories or groups.

Write the conclusion: In the conclusion, summarize the main points of your essay and restate your thesis statement. Provide a final thought or reflection on the topic.

Edit and revise: Once you have completed your essay, take some time to edit and revise it. Check for grammar and spelling errors, and make sure your ideas flow logically.

For example, let’s say you are writing about different types of pets. Your thesis statement might be: “There are three main types of pets: dogs, cats, and fish.”


Your outline might look like this:

I. Introduction

Introduce the topic of different types of pets
Provide some background information on the topic
End the introduction with your thesis statement
II. Types of pets

Dogs
Cats
Fish
III. Description of each type

Dogs: loyal, trainable, and great for protection
Cats: independent, low maintenance, and good for companionship
Fish: easy to care for, relaxing to watch, and great for children
IV. Conclusion

Summarize the main points of your essay
Restate your thesis statement
Provide a final thought or reflection on the topic
With these steps and the above illustration, you can write a classification essay that effectively categorizes or sorts items or ideas into groups.

Q/Below is a hypothetical scenario. Please discuss and address the…          Q/Below is a hypothetical scenario. Please discuss and address the scenario from an ethical point of view by referring to code of ethics and (care/integrity/competency) principles.  It is April 2022. You’re the pharmacist working at a small pharmacy in regional Victoria. Many of the people in the community are of non-English speaking background. There is also a large proportion of people who are retired, and people with a low socio-economic status. One day, the owner of the pharmacy calls all staff for a staff meeting. The owner informs everyone that he is bringing in a range of new homeopathy medicine products and is advertising it as a ‘COVID-19 prevention starter pack’, retailing at $35 per packet. He would like all staff to recommend this to every customer who comes into the pharmacy, and no customer should leave without making a purchase. To enforce the sales of this starter pack, the owner also stopped offering COVID-19 vaccinations. After the meeting, the owner pulls you aside and states that wants you to enforce generic substitutions on all patients unless the ‘No brand substitution allowed’ box is ticked. He also says that this is something you should tell all pharmacy students and dispensary technicians to do. Immediately after your conversation with the owner, one of your regular customers, Mrs Jennis comes in. Mrs Jennis doesn’t speak English and sometimes gets confused with her medications. As a result, you usually supply her the same brand of medications because you know Mrs Jennis recognizes her pills by the colour of the boxes. The owner talks with her and tells her that he is going to “do her a favour” by giving her the generic medication this time, which is “just the same as the one she normally gets, just less expensive”. You can see that Mrs Jennis is already getting confused. The blood pressure medication she usually takes comes in a green box, but the new generic the owner is giving her comes in a white box, which is the same box colour as her diabetes medication. A few weeks later, your pharmacy gets 10 boxes of government approved oral COVID-19 medications indicated for COVID-19 treatment. You later get a phone call from a local doctor asking if you have any stock, as she has a 90-year-old patient who is eligible for the medication. Your owner who was standing nearby snatches the phone over and tells the doctor that you didn’t get any stock. The owner later tells you that it’s good to keep some COVID-19 medications on hand ‘just in case’, and no one checks on a small pharmacy like this one anyway. Later, the owner’s son comes in and hands you several scripts which all requests for the oral COVID-19 medications. You notice that they are all for the owner’s family. You notice that the doctor’s signature is missing on several scripts, and you question the legitimacy of the script. Upon checking the dispensing history, you notice that the owner has been regularly dispensing medications to his family without any doctors details. From your knowledge, the owner’s family are all young, healthy, and fully vaccinated. You ask the owner’s son if anyone in the family has COVID-19 and he says no. You then receive a phone call from the owner who tells you that the script is perfectly fine, and you can dispense it. A week later the owner comes back. He pulls you aside and tells you that he has been keeping a close eye on sales figures and that your ‘COVID-19 prevention starter pack’ sales are the lowest. The owner tells you that you need to “do better” and that there are “plenty of young pharmacists who would like your job – you can leave if you don’t like it”.                                                             Health Science                                                Science                                                Nursing                            HEALTH PHAR1017                                                                      Share QuestionEmailCopy link                              Comments (0)

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